How Television Can Help Your Writing (Part 3)

Television is more about than great characters. It can also transport you to places around the world: the outback of Australia, the islands of the Caribbean, the peak of Mount Everest. While cameras, technology, and budgets sometimes allow for on location shooting of some shows (think Downton Abbey or Death in Paradise among others), many television shows are still shot on a set in a different part of the world. Yet a good show gives a sense of the setting, and the setting enriches the show’s atmosphere, tone, and mood. Writers too can use the setting of their book to provide a rich layer, almost to the point of creating a character.

Atmosphere. I didn’t watch every episode of Downton Abbey, but from the time the dog appears on the screen and a rolling list of actors’ names flickers on the screen, the viewer gets the sense this is not a sitcom. The lack of bright colors, the staid splendor of the upstairs, the stark contrast of the kitchen all point to high drama. Writers of historical romance can evoke a similar tone with details of a world long gone. Writers of women’s fiction can evoke the setting and use the weather and time of day to layer in more sensory details. Mystery writers especially can use setting for atmosphere. A cozy mystery heroine is far more likely to inhale the smell of old books or coffeehouse coffee whereas a hardboiled detective may note the smell of a police precinct or inky coffee from an ancient coffeemaker. Don’t lose a chance to evoke atmosphere with sensory details such as the smell of the setting, the weather surrounding the characters, or the feel of objects around them.

Tone. Theme songs can often tell a lot about a television show. For decades, catchy theme songs often set the tone for the show. Who could forget that Gilligan was on a three-hour tour? Or not laugh at petite Lurch, neat Uncle Fester, or sweet Grandmamma Addams? Books, however, don’t have theme songs, but a writer’s voice and pacing can add to the tone. Fast, action scene? Your theme song then has punchy, short sentences. Other times you might want long, lyrical paragraphs when it’s a longer piece of exposition with description.

Mood. I’m not a huge fan of overbearing laugh tracks, but when someone else laughs, it’s easier to laugh along with them. When Rob Petrie (Dick Van Dyke) picked himself off the floor after falling over the ottoman, all while having a smile on his face, we knew we could laugh with him at whatever happened to Laura or Ritchie or Sally or Buddy. When a character laughs at himself or shows his or her sense of humor, we can laugh along, and in romantic comedies, that’s a plus. By setting the mood through the characters’ actions and by their surroundings, a writer can help the reader bond to those characters and relate all the more. When Penny and Leonard and Sheldon all share takeout with Bernadette and Raj and Howard, the viewer knows it’s okay to laugh. When Beckett was called to a crime scene with Castle on her heels, the viewer knows she’s not going to rest until the real killer is apprehended and justice is served. As writers, establishing the mood and the tone can set the stage for the reader and hook the reader into the story all the faster.

Watch your favorite television show and notice how the writers incorporate the setting to create atmosphere. Whether it’s the Addams’ museum of a house or Central Perk or the Caribbean shore, the setting will help tune the viewer in to what type of show and add layers to the show, making us appreciate the show all the more.

How Television Can Help Your Writing (Part 2)

Television shows are a blessing and a curse. A chance to escape, a chance for education, a chance for adventure. While people tend to watch television for different reasons, the characters bring them back to the same television shows. If you don’t like the characters of a show, you aren’t likely to give that program a second chance. Last week, I discussed three heroines whose characters sparked imagination and became favorites of viewers. As writers, learning from television characters can help with our own writing. Lucy Ricardo had goals and wanted stardom, Mary Richards had heart and formed a family of her friends and co-workers around her, and Jessica Fletcher found more conflict and more dead bodies than any of us would ever want to encounter but we loved watching anyway. Today, I’m going to delve into secondary characters, three sidekicks who writers can learn from in how the complement or create a foil for the main character.

Dan Fielding (the womanizing foil). In the eighties, I loved being able to stay up past my bedtime and watch Night Court. Yes, Judge Harry Stone was a great main character with magic tricks up his sleeve, Mel Torme on his record player, and wise decisions flowing from the bench. However, Dan Fielding was the reason I kept watching. A perfect foil for the optimistic prosecutor Christine and for the magician judge, Dan Fielding had a pick-up line on his lips and a swagger on his step. A great deal of Dan Fielding’s character is owed to the acting skills of John Larroquette, for it would have been easy to play Dan Fielding as a pure womanizer who didn’t care about anything or anyone besides himself. Yet underneath those smooth lines and leering looks, there was something about Dan that compelled you to keep watching, compelled you to see past those lines and hope his cynicism was just that – a foil to the other characters and a mask to the world. And the finale proved it. For when the gang split up, Dan himself had the biggest surprise up his sleeve. He was following his heart and going after Christine. Her rose glasses and optimism struck a chord in his womanizing heart, and he didn’t want to let her out of his life. The romantic in me who thought all those years Christine and Harry should get together was much more satisfied with this. The foil and contrast of the prosecutor and defense attorney and judge trio kept the show going and kept me tuning in. What could have been a stereotypical character was transformed into a breathing person.

Niles Crane (the stuffy relative). I still remember when Cheers was about to pour its last drink and go off the air. I read an article that said there was going to be a spinoff. I waited with anticipation about which supporting character was going to get his or her show. Would I get to meet all of Carla’s crazy relatives? Would I at last see the elusive Vera? Would Woody leave the bar? None of the above. The spinoff character was going to be my least favorite Cheers character, Frasier Crane. I was hesitant about tuning into the first show. While Frasier had been the center of my all-time favorite Cheers episode (the one where the incomparable Emma Thompson played Frasier’s ex-wife, Nanny Gee), I wasn’t sure if I’d like the new show. Then I watched the first episode and fell in love with Martin, Roz, Daphne, Eddie, and Niles. The producers had created an ensemble cast for the ages. Writers can learn something from each of these characters: how a physical handicap didn’t stop Martin, how a romantic spirit led Daphne to keep looking for love, how to be a strong woman in a male-dominated workplace like Roz. Yet the character who could have been a stuffy relative and nothing more was fleshed out and became likable anyway. Underneath his pretentious mannerisms, Niles longs for love. He’s trapped in a loveless marriage with a toothpick of a wife, but he doesn’t stop yearning for a caring relationship, both with his family and with the woman of his dreams. And by the end of the series, Niles has a son of his own with the woman of his dreams. Layering your supporting characters and making sure they go beyond a stereotype can enrich your writing.

Marie Barone (the meddling mother). Just thinking about Doris Roberts’ portrayal of the meddling Marie brings a smile to my face. The writers didn’t hold back punches with Marie. It was clear she played favorites. It was clear she had opinions of her own about how Ray’s wife should put him on a pedestal. And it was clear she had aspirations of her own when she tried her hand at sculpture. Had the writers just stopped there, Marie would have been the stereotypical mother/mother-in-law character, but fortunately they layered her character with such richness that Doris Roberts sunk her teeth in the role and made her very memorable. How did they layer her character and go beyond the stereotype? They latched onto everyday topics and magnified the humor. In the pilot, Ray tells Marie and Frank he bought them a gift: he enrolled them in a “fruit-of-the-month” offer. Marie and Frank replied they didn’t need it and what became a seemingly minor, run-of-the-mill topic was magnified for laughs. The writers did the same thing for canisters, salmon, and sculptures.

By layering your supporting characters and going beyond stereotypes, you can perk up your writing and make those supporting characters all the memorable. Who are some of your favorite television supporting characters?

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How Television Can Help Your Writing (part one)

While watching too much television can hurt your writing if you’re using television as an excuse not to write, television can also help your writing. Think about your favorite television shows. Think of some of the most memorable characters to ever jump off the screen into your heart. Everyone has his or her own favorites. I still love Lucy after all these years. From strong leads to secondary character to entertaining dialogue, television is a good starting place to think about how to write a book and how you want your characters to fly off the page. This week we’ll look at three of my favorite lead television characters to see how their goals, motivations, and conflicts can be a starting place for you to think about your own characters.

Lucy Ricardo. I Love Lucy premiered in 1951 and ran for six years. A simple enough premise, a housewife longs for fame under the watchful eye of her bandleader husband, was a comedic goldmine, thanks in no small part to its leading lady. Her goal of wanting to be a star was relatable, and Lucy herself made Lucy Ricardo likable. The conflict? While Lucille Ball’s talent was real and she worked hard to make herself a star, Lucy Ricardo was rather klutzy and worked harder at trying to get a break rather than develop her talent. Not to mention she always found herself in zany predicaments. Do a search for vitameatavegamin on YouTube if you’ve never seen any episodes of I Love Lucy. While Lucy is convinced this commercial will launch her career, she fails to take into account the alcoholic content of the tonic she’s pitching with hilarious results. After all these years, though, Lucy Ricardo still resonates. Why? Because her constant struggle for fame is relatable and after all these years, her sense of humor makes her likable. Think of a goal that is universal and relatable and that can be the starting point for your main character.

Mary Richards. The Mary Tyler Moore Show premiered in 1970 and went out on while still on top in 1977. The theme song of the show set up the premise: a working woman who was intent on turning the world on with her smile. When Mary threw her cap up into the city square, you knew she was a gutsy girl who wasn’t afraid of going after what she wanted. As associate producer, Mary brought together a cast of diverse characters and made a makeshift family. People loved Mary just as much as Lucy because nothing kept her down. Best friend moved to New York? That was okay. A love affair gone wrong? That was okay. She had guts, determination, and a smile that showed she wasn’t going to give up. That motivation of persevering with a smile? Relatable and likable. Think of a motivation for your main character that is also universal and make sure your character has the perseverance to follow her dreams.

Jessica Fletcher. Murder, She Wrote premiered in 1986 and ran forever. The show revolved around a mystery writer who solved crimes. She confronted murder, after murder, after murder, and you get the idea. More than once, I’ve heard people say that if Jessica Fletcher was a real person, they’d run whenever she was around because she kept finding dead bodies. Why am I bringing up Jessica Fletcher? Talk about conflict. Every week she was either a suspect or one of her closest relatives/friends/daughter of her beloved college roommate was also a suspect in murder. Her personal freedom and the accused’s freedom were on the line. Not only that but Jessica strived to find justice for the victim, and did so, week after week after week, and you get the idea. High stakes leads to high conflict. Although no one I know would want to live in Cabot Cove, Jessica Fletcher confronted conflict each week and emerged victorious. That type of high stakes and high conflict is important for your protagonist.

Think of your own favorite characters and their goals, motivations, and conflicts. See if the characters you love can add depth to your writing. And let me know who your favorite television characters are. I’m always on the lookout for a new television show.

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Wacky Weekend: Television Shows

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When I was a kid, I watched my fair share of television. And another person’s fair share. And even a third person’s fair share. I can tell you all about Samantha Stephens, Jaime Sommers, and Diana Knight. If you have a question about Lori Beth Cunningham, I’m the person to call. Same about Angela Channing, Fallon Colby or Valene Ewing. I can name all six Brady kids. And yes, I watched the reunion specials. But then, something happened. I went to college and stopped watching as much television. Oh, I still watched often, but not as often. I found similarities in my life with characters such as Monica Geller and laughed at other characters like Daphne Moon. But I didn’t watch as much. I fell in love, married my wonderful hubby, and had children. I watched less and less unless you count almost every episode of Bear in the Big Blue House and Curious George. With my children now getting old enough for me and my wonderful hubby to start watching television again, I’ve found it hard to decide what to watch. My wonderful hubby extols the virtues of Breaking Bad and The Walking Dead. My tastes run lighter than those two very critically acclaimed, thought-provoking dramatic shows. So I’m playing catch up with television.

First on my list was How I Met Your Mother. I laughed and cried watching eight seasons on Netflix so I could watch the final season live. For the interests of all involved and because I don’t like to whine or post negative reviews online, we’ll skip how I feel about the final episode. Notice I did write feel because the finale still evokes strong feelings in this romance writer.

I’ve wanted to start watching The Office or Parks and Recreation, but last year at RWA Nationals, I heard wonderful things about Castle. When an episode showed up on my cable provider without commercials, I watched the pilot. Then I introduced it to my wonderful hubby who loved Firefly. So he now watches Castle with me. We are presently on the second season. I’m enjoying having a television show to enjoy with my hubby.

I’ve also started watching Downton Abbey. I’m at the start of the third season. I’ve had friends tell me I should stop now because they cried at turns of events. Since I have an account on Facebook, I know the spoilers. I know what’s coming, but I’m determined to watch the rest of seasons three and four before January because my wonderful hubby loves this show. I admit I like certain characters, but not all the story lines appeal to me. I don’t know many people other than my wonderful hubby of having the dilemma of having to choose whether to watch The Walking Dead or Downton Abbey live and wait until the next day to watch the other show.

For the first time, I am not caught up with any show on television. The only show I stayed current with over the past eight years was Psych which came to an end this year. Yes, I already miss Shawn and Gus. I loved the show so much that Cupcake and Chunk’s teddy bears are named Shawn and Gus. I also stayed current with Monk. That was the last finale I loved when I watched it live on television while it was being broadcast; I didn’t watch the Psych finale until last month although I did love the finale of that as well.

But I will trade not being attuned with modern television shows in return for having television take a backseat during my children’s early years. In the words of the immortal Chance (Peter Sellers’ character in Being There) although with quite a different context, “I like to watch.” What’s your favorite television show? What show on television that is still in current production is your must see television? Let me know.