How Television Can Help Your Writing (part one)

While watching too much television can hurt your writing if you’re using television as an excuse not to write, television can also help your writing. Think about your favorite television shows. Think of some of the most memorable characters to ever jump off the screen into your heart. Everyone has his or her own favorites. I still love Lucy after all these years. From strong leads to secondary character to entertaining dialogue, television is a good starting place to think about how to write a book and how you want your characters to fly off the page. This week we’ll look at three of my favorite lead television characters to see how their goals, motivations, and conflicts can be a starting place for you to think about your own characters.

Lucy Ricardo. I Love Lucy premiered in 1951 and ran for six years. A simple enough premise, a housewife longs for fame under the watchful eye of her bandleader husband, was a comedic goldmine, thanks in no small part to its leading lady. Her goal of wanting to be a star was relatable, and Lucy herself made Lucy Ricardo likable. The conflict? While Lucille Ball’s talent was real and she worked hard to make herself a star, Lucy Ricardo was rather klutzy and worked harder at trying to get a break rather than develop her talent. Not to mention she always found herself in zany predicaments. Do a search for vitameatavegamin on YouTube if you’ve never seen any episodes of I Love Lucy. While Lucy is convinced this commercial will launch her career, she fails to take into account the alcoholic content of the tonic she’s pitching with hilarious results. After all these years, though, Lucy Ricardo still resonates. Why? Because her constant struggle for fame is relatable and after all these years, her sense of humor makes her likable. Think of a goal that is universal and relatable and that can be the starting point for your main character.

Mary Richards. The Mary Tyler Moore Show premiered in 1970 and went out on while still on top in 1977. The theme song of the show set up the premise: a working woman who was intent on turning the world on with her smile. When Mary threw her cap up into the city square, you knew she was a gutsy girl who wasn’t afraid of going after what she wanted. As associate producer, Mary brought together a cast of diverse characters and made a makeshift family. People loved Mary just as much as Lucy because nothing kept her down. Best friend moved to New York? That was okay. A love affair gone wrong? That was okay. She had guts, determination, and a smile that showed she wasn’t going to give up. That motivation of persevering with a smile? Relatable and likable. Think of a motivation for your main character that is also universal and make sure your character has the perseverance to follow her dreams.

Jessica Fletcher. Murder, She Wrote premiered in 1986 and ran forever. The show revolved around a mystery writer who solved crimes. She confronted murder, after murder, after murder, and you get the idea. More than once, I’ve heard people say that if Jessica Fletcher was a real person, they’d run whenever she was around because she kept finding dead bodies. Why am I bringing up Jessica Fletcher? Talk about conflict. Every week she was either a suspect or one of her closest relatives/friends/daughter of her beloved college roommate was also a suspect in murder. Her personal freedom and the accused’s freedom were on the line. Not only that but Jessica strived to find justice for the victim, and did so, week after week after week, and you get the idea. High stakes leads to high conflict. Although no one I know would want to live in Cabot Cove, Jessica Fletcher confronted conflict each week and emerged victorious. That type of high stakes and high conflict is important for your protagonist.

Think of your own favorite characters and their goals, motivations, and conflicts. See if the characters you love can add depth to your writing. And let me know who your favorite television characters are. I’m always on the lookout for a new television show.

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